Translations 7

LE: 
Hi I’m back hehe^^… Again I need your help about tausug words hehe, what does “amunasa” and “hundung” mean?
Also what is “hijab” and “tirung”? 
Thanks a lot^^
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Anak iluh: 
Hello again 🙂
Have you checked my posts on www.tausug101.blogspot.com? I have been updating the blog by posting new words every fridays, hope you have checked them 🙂
Anyway, “amuna sa” is a common term that may roughly mean “yeah, that’s it!”, it is used to express affirmation or confirmation or agreement with the speaker.
Example Rashid said: “Mapasu’ isab in bilik ini!” (This room seem hot!)
And you can reply: “Amuna sa” (yeah, you are right/that’s it)
Hundung” means “stop”. Itbcan both be used as verb or a command, as in “hundung kaw!” (You stop!)
Hijab” is an Arabic term (you already know that Arabic sometimes get mixed with our langguage), it means “a covering”. Basically it’s the VEIL that you see Muslim women wear in accordance to the command of God in the Quran to cover their parts, except the face and hands. Try searching in google.image and type in HIJAB.
Tirung” or “Turung” is the Tausug word for Hijab.
Again, dont forget to like our page in FB: www.facebook.com/tausug101
Salam! Kamaya daran!
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Note: This is part of the series “Translations from my inbox“. I am sharing some selected emails and questions/translations-to-be-done sent by our readers 🙂 Their identities were hidden for, you know, privacy thing. And oh, THIS IS NOT AN ABSOLUTE ANSWER TO THEIR QUESTIONS! I am no expert in this field so please, if you happen to notice any errors in these posts pls do notify me that I may correct them.
I would gladly hear your concerns 😀 naks
Thank you for visiting and supporting this humble blog 🙂
Hope you will continue learning Bahasa Sug the fun way!
Salam Kasilasa!
-Anak iluh

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Translations 6

Mary GM: 

Good day!
Hi po, tanong ko lang po kung ano ang translation ng “i miss you” in tausug dialect.  Thanks much!
Anakiluh:
Hello Mary 

Ang “I miss you” sa Tausug ay “Nagtumtum aku kaymu.”
Root word: “Tumtum” = “Remember”o “Longing”
🙂
MGM: Thank you so much!
Anakiluh: No problem po 🙂
Pls check our blog www.tausug101.blogspot.com for updates. We post new sts of Tausug words every friday 😉
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Ronald C.: hi sir,
gusto ko lang malaman kung tausug word po ba ito at ano ung meaning 
“kanami sanggad law mo guapagid”
 thanks
Anakiluh: 
Hi Ronald!
I am so sorry it took me about 4 months to reply -_- been busy with acads and i overlooked a lot of emails including yours.
Anyway, i do not recognize the words you sent me. I am sure they are not TAUSUG, MERANAW, CHAVACANO OR ARABIC. I am jot sure if its maguindanaon or sinama or iyakan though (as I am only trying to learn them hehe). Pls ask me another question on Bahasa Sug. 
(Note: He never emailed me back @_@ costumer unsatisfied.  haha)
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Kim: please translate the word mahal ko into tausug/muslim..thanx 

Anakiluh: 
Mahal ko is “Kalasahan ku” in Tausug.

Also check: “How to say “My Dear”? http://tausug101.blogspot.com/2012/06/how-to-say-my-dear.html

Different ways of saying “My Love” in Tausug

🙂

salam kasilasa, AIMD
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===================================================
Note: This is part of the series “Translations from my inbox“. I am sharing some selected emails and questions/translations-to-be-done sent by our readers 🙂 Their identities were hidden for, you know, privacy thing. And oh, THIS IS NOT AN ABSOLUTE ANSWER TO THEIR QUESTIONS! I am no expert in this field so please, if you happen to notice any errors in these posts pls do notify me that I may correct them.
I would gladly hear your concerns 😀 naks
Thank you for visiting and supporting this humble blog 🙂
Hope you will continue learning Bahasa Sug the fun way!
Salam Kasilasa!
-Anak iluh


Translations 5

You can check the tags: Translations for more, uhm, translations-related posts. hehe

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Kathleen:
salam!! i saw ur blog can i ask whats forever in tausug pls reply asap magsukul!!


Anakiluh:

Hello Kathleen 🙂 Forever is “Saláma-láma” (with stress on the third and fourth “a”)

Thanks for visiting my blog 🙂
you can always email me for more translations.
Magsukul!
(Magsukul is “Thank you” by the way. Oh, I think you already know that… oh well, dont forget to pls like my page on facebook: www.facebook.com/tausug101 (you can check my updates there or directly PM me for translations)
Salam kasilasa!
-Anakiluh
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Mary-Ann C.: 
What was the meaning of MARAYAW? Tnx again :))
Anak iluh: 
Hello and good day Mary-Ann

“Marayaw” means “Good”

like “Marayaw Addat” meaning “Good attitude” (Mabait) 

or “Marayaw in adlaw yan.” (Today is a good day)
Mary-Ann C.: 
Goodeve. What was the meaning of “umang” ?
And how about this “ayaw kaw masusa” thankyou 🙂
Anak iluh: 
Hello.

I am not sure with “umang”, I know its some kind of an animal hehe
“Ayaw kaw masusa” means “Do not be Sad”

Mary-Ann C.: 
How can i say “wag kana magloko loko” or “wag kna magloko pwde ba”? Hehe tnx 🙂
Anak iluh: 
Medyo mahirap tong tanong mo haha
Well, it depends kasi kung ano ibig mong sabihin sa kausap mo. example kung “Wag ka na magloko-loko” ay may pahalong biro, pwede mong sabihin sa Tausug na:

“Ayaw na kaw maglangug-langug ba.”

pero kung medyo seryoso na parang ang mensahe ay “Wag mo na ako lokohin”

“Ayaw mu na aku dupanga.” ang tamang gamitin. It’s up to you 🙂

hehe. Hope it helped. Good day 🙂

pls like my page on facebook: www.facebook.com/tausug101 hehehe
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===================================================
Note: This is part of the series “Translations from my inbox“. I am sharing some selected emails and questions/translations-to-be-done sent by our readers 🙂 Their identities were hidden for, you know, privacy thing. And oh, THIS IS NOT AN ABSOLUTE ANSWER TO THEIR QUESTIONS! I am no expert in this field so please, if you happen to notice any errors in these posts pls do notify me that I may correct them.
I would gladly hear your concerns 😀 naks
Thank you for visiting and supporting this humble blog 🙂
Hope you will continue learning Bahasa Sug the fun way!
Salam Kasilasa!
-Anak iluh


Translations 4

Here are some Translation projects I can share right rom my inbox 🙂
Note: These are not absolute answers, I may be wrong in some of these translations…SO pls, if you happened to find some errors in this post, pls do notify me. I am trying my best to make them right though… hehe

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Lady E.: Hello again^^ 

what do these words mean?… 
pabias
nangalu
kaimu
makaluman
naghapdih
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Tausug101:

Hello 🙂

Pabias” (correctly: “Pabiyas”) is from the root word Biyas (shame) added with a future-tense pre-fix Pa- which means “to shame one’s self”. As in “Nagpabiyas in tau yaun.” (That guy is making himself shameful). It is kind of hard to find a word that will translate it though.Biyas is rather used in a really negative, degrading way…
Nangalu is from the root-verb “Kalu” (fight) added with the prefix “na-” used in third-person past-tenses of verbs that are done intentionally. It roughly means “fought (someone, intentionally)”. As in the example: “Nangalu hi Abdul bata’-bata’ ha lungan nila” (Abdul intentionally fought/quarreled with a kid in their neighborhood)
Kaimu (correctly: “kaymu”) has two uses:
(1): it is an example of an independent, oblique pronoun used in referring to possession or ownership. Kaymu is used for singular 2nd-person nouns (the one being talked to). Example: “Kaymu in tinapay yan?” (Is that bread yours?) or “In lamisahan ini kaymu saini bagay.” (This table is yours my friend)
(2) It can also be used as a direct subject of the verb i.e. the verb is received or acted on that person (still second person: theone being talked to). This happenes when a verb is placed before the pronoun Kaymu. As in the example: “Hidihil ku in basu ini kaymu” (I will givethis cup to you) or “Unu in biyayta‘ niya kaymu?” (What did he say to you?”). For more readings, you should check my post on Pronouns III: Oblique forms
Makaluman is from the root word Luman (Shame or bashful) added with the conditional, future-tense prefix Maka-. This is a less degrading synonym of Biyas. It is the equivalent of “Nakakhiya” in Tagalog. You can use this in the following example: “Makaluman isab duma magbissara kaniya.” (Nakakahiya naman makipag-usap sa kanya) Nahirapan akong i-english sorry hahahaha
Naghapdi’ from the root word Hapdi’ which means “hunger” added with the past-tense prefix “Nag-“. Naghapdi’ can mean “Getting hungry” (another simplier term which has the same meaning is “Hiyapdi’” as in “Hiyapdi aku” (I am hungry) . But this term Naghapdi’although having the same meaning ahs a different use. We can consider this as a ‘slang’ in Tausug Langguage. When someone says: “Naghapdi’ na yan!” (We are getting hungry!) you can almost say that this was said mockingly or jokingly. 
An example situation that you can use this is when you are working with your friends and you are getting hungry, you say “Naghapdi’ na!” to discretely tell them “hey! Let’s take a break and have some snacks”
That ends our translations 😀 Hope this helped.
Salam kasialsa!
-Anakiluh

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===================================================
Note: This is part of the series “Translations from my inbox“. I am sharing some selected emails and questions/translations-to-be-done sent by our readers 🙂 Their identities were hidden for, you know, privacy thing. And oh, THIS IS NOT AN ABSOLUTE ANSWER TO THEIR QUESTIONS! I am no expert in this field so please, if you happen to notice any errors in these posts pls do notify me that I may correct them.
I would gladly hear your concerns 😀 naks
Thank you for visiting and supporting this humble blog 🙂
Hope you will continue learning Bahasa Sug the fun way!
Salam Kasilasa!
-Anak iluh


Piil: An intro to Verbs

February 18, 2013  Monday

         Bismillah. This is an Introductory post for “Part 3: Verbs” in Tausug 101: Learning Bahasa Súg. For the list of past lessons, please go to: Lists of Lessons

         Piil the TauSúg term for Verbs comes from the Arabic “Fi’lun” or “Fi’il” (Faa-‘Ain-Laam) which means “Action” or simply put, “Verbs”. These terms are involved in actions that had been done before (past), that is being done (present), and will be done in the future (future).


         In learning any languages, learning the verbs and their different forms is perhaps one of the hardest things to do (at least for me). There are just a lot of things to consider in changing the verbs done in the present to its past tense, then the future, and so on.  This of course is also applicable to our beloved Bahasa Súg. Really, a single post like this would be enough for us to realize how complicated the Tausug Verbs and their constructions, forms and applications are. That’s why we have this “Introduction”, hopefully to make things less complicated, In shaa Allah.
         Let’s look at some examples of Piil in Bahasa Súg:

Bahasa Súg English
Root word Kaun To eat
Past Kimaun aku tinapay. I ate bread.
Kiyaun ku in tinapay. I ate the bread.
Nakakaun aku tinapay. I have eaten bread.
Present Kimakaun aku tinapay. I am eating bread.
Kiyakaun ku in tinapay. I am eating the bread.
Nagkakaun aku tinapay. I am eating bread.
Future Kumaun aku tinapay. I will eat bread.
Kaunun ku in tinapay. I will eat the bread.
Makakaun da aku tinapay. I will soon eat bread.
                Here, we have the root word Kaun which means “To eat” and the some of the forms it can take. If we want to use the Past form of the word Kaun, we can choose from the different past forms it has. Among those are Kimaun and Kiyaun which both means “ate” or Nakakaun which means “have eaten”.  On the other hand, to use it in Present form, we can either use Kimakaun, Kiyakaun or Nagkakaun. Same goes with the Future forms, Kumaun, Kaunun, and Makakaun.

                Tricky isn’t it?
The examples we have above are nothing but a few of the many different forms a Tausug Piil can have, depending on how it is used. This only shows how complicated the Piil  are. For a complete list of the different forms of Piil in BahasaSúg (all 43 of them!), you can download the file “Manga kapiil-piilan: Different forms of Verbs in Bahasa Sug” at the end of this post.
Before we begin learning the Piil here are some things we have to know first:

Root Words

         Tausug Piil, just like any verbs in other languages follow certain rules in word construction. They can change from one form to the other, together with their meanings, depending on how they are used in a sentence.  And one enormous factor that can help a beginner in mastering the different forms of the verbs is by knowing which part of the word is actually the Root Word (Piil Puunan*) and which is not. Of course, because the root words of each verb can always be different, knowing the Not-Root-Words (the affixes or Hurup gaganap) will be helpful. 

The Affixes used in Piil

         Affixes according to wikipedia are “units of words” attached to root words to form a new word. There are many affixes used in constructing Piil in Bahasa Sug. These are prefixes, infixes and suffixes added to the root words of a verb that changes their meanings. Here is a list of the common affixes added to Piil in Bahasa Sug:

Prefixes
(added at the beginning)
Infixes
(added in between)
Suffixes
(added at the end)
Im-
-im-
-un/-hun
Iy-
-iy-
-an/-han
Um-
-um-
-a/-ha
Na-/Ma-
-i/-hi
Naka-/Maka-
Nag-/Mag-/Pag-
Nang-/Mang-
Pa-/Piya-/
Ka-/Kiya-
Ha-/Hika-
                By simply removing these affixes in a verb, one will be able to identify the root word and thus the meaning of the verb itself. Soon we will learn that a Piil mayexhibit attachment ofone of the affixes above singularly like Imiyan, Kumita’,and Bassahun; or with two or more affixes as in Piyabaytaan, and Naglingugan.  Familiarize with these “affixes” and things will be easier on the next lessons to come, In shaa Allah.

Changes in Sounds

         Another unique thing that is mostly found in Piil in Bahasa Sugis how letters (or sounds) can change from one form to the other. We have already learned about how the letter /D/ can change into the sound of /R/ in lesson 3##link##. In learning the verbs, there are a few more changes similar with that of letters /D/ and /R/ that we must be familiar with. They are the following:
The Letters B and P can change to /M/: Verbs starting with letters B and P will have the sound of /M/ in some form of verbs like: Bayta’ to Namayta’; Patay to Miyatay; and so on.
The Letters S and T can change to /N/: Verbs beginning with letters S and T can also take the sound of /N/ just like in Sukna’ to Nanukna’ and Taykud  to Nanaykuri.

The Letter K can change to /Ng/: Verbs starting with K like Kita’ and Kaykit can change and take the sound of /Ng/ as in Nangita’ and Nangaykit, respectively.

And of course, the Letter D can change to /R/. As learned in Lesson 3.

                POINT OF INFORMATION: The abovementioned changes don’t always happen every time the verb with the corresponding letter changes forms. There are only certain conditions when these changes are done which we will soon learn in the succeeding lessons.



Word Orders

         Changes in the order of the words in a sentence construction are a fairly important thing to be learned by all beginners. There are certain times that the order of words (whether the subject comes first than the verb) may affect the meaning of the sentence as a whole. There are also some cases, in which the thought of the whole sentence is not changed regardless of the word orders. And we also have the “acceptable” and “unacceptable” word orders, which we will learn later on.
         Let’s study the following examples and observe how the words are arranged: (We will also use the following abbreviations to make it easier: S = Subject or actor of the verb, V = verb; and O = Object of the verb or receiver of action)

Bahasa Sug Word Order English
Piil: Imulin Verb: Held, pt of hold
Imulin siya pa kahuy. V-S-pa O She held on to a tree.
Pa kahuy siya imulin. Pa O-S-V She held on to a tree.
Piil: Limaksu Verb: jumped
Limaksu in sapi’. V in S The cow jumped.
Sapi’ in limaksu. S in V It was the cow that jumped.
In sapi’, limaksu. In S, V The cow, jumped.
In limaksu, sapi’. In V, S The thing that jumped was the cow.
            It can be observed in the examples above how changing the orders of these words can also change the thought and manner of delivering the sentence. Using noun markers such as “in” and “sin” in these sentences, and knowing how they contribute to the “story” are also important. In shaa Allah we will learn more about these in the next lessons.

The Imanggawta’ and Iyanggawtaan.

         In dealing with words with actions (i.e. verbs), there are at least other two very essential “components” that we have to deal with: (1) the doer of the verb; and (2) the receiver of the verb. 
         For the sake of higher learning, we will use the following terms in this blog: We will call the “doer of the verb” as imanggawta’ (meaning, someone who did the action) and the “receiver of the verb” as iyanggawtaan (meaning, someone who accepts the deed or action). These two components are very important in sentence constructions that we must always put them into mind whenever we learn new forms of verbs: how they are placed (after or before the verb); how they look like; etc. We will try as much to integrate these in the next lessons to come, in shaa Allah. 
In the sentence:               Kiyaun ku in manuk.

Piil: Kiyaun (ate)
Imanggawta’ (actor) Ku (1st person Pronoun, “me”)
Iyanggawtaan (receiver) Manuk (Chicken)
In English: I ate the chicken

Look what happens if we change the pronoun “ku” to “aku”, and the noun marker “in” to the genitive marker “sin”, without changing the verb:

Kiyaun aku sin manuk.

Piil: Kiyaun (ate)
Imanggawta’ (actor) Manuk (Chicken)
Iyanggawtaan (receiver) Aku (1st person Pronoun, “me”)
In English: I was eaten by the chicken =)

         I believe that’s all we need to learn for now for the introduction. Alhamdulillah I hope this post had been a useful introductory post before we finally begin the longest series of lessons for a single topic: the Piil (Verbs) in Bahasa Sug.  And as promised, here is the link for the file: MANGA KAPIIL-PIILAN: Different forms of Verbs in Bahasa Sug 
         See you soon! (I won’t promise that I can post by next week, but I will try my best to keep on working on this beautiful project, In shaa Allah.) Thank you all for the support. (for a pdf copy of this lecture,  kindly click here.)
Salam Kasilasa!